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  • susan birnbaum fisher 10:19 pm on April 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: big data, information revolution   

    A very interesting article from Wired Magazine to celebrate their twentieth anniversary.

    “TWENTY YEARS AGO electronic health records were nascent, digital music was mostly a fantasy, Twitter was what birds did, and Google cofounder Sergey Brin was a summer intern at Wolfram Research. The past two decades have seen a nuclear explosion in the collection and storage of digital information. In 2012, 2.8 zettabytes—that’s 1 sextillion bytes, or the equivalent of 24 quintillion tweets—were created or replicated, according to the research firm IDC. There are hundreds or thousands of petabyte-scale databases today, and we’d compare their size to what existed two decades ago, only every time the basis of comparison would be zero. Here’s a look at some of the world’s largest and most interesting data sets.”

    http://www.wired.com/magazine/2013/04/bigdata/

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    • Julia 1:57 pm on April 25, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      Oh I got really excited, until I realized these datasets aren’t open. Funny how I just assume that I can see the data whenever I want.

    • susan birnbaum fisher 2:58 am on April 30, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      Well I guess this goes to show that while there are projects on the forefront that are using linked open data, there are plenty of projects out there that haven’t gotten to that step yet, This definitely is a testament of the times. How amazing would it be if all of these truly were open!

    • johnuhromano 2:38 pm on May 1, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      So at first I was confused over the whole Twelve tweets before 2012 but then I finally noticed that these numbers are in terabytes. I can not believe how many business email exist. I am blown away!

  • Carolyn Li-Madeo 12:33 am on February 1, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: big data, ,   

    Here’s a Nova clip on the unicorn tapestries:
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/chudnovsky-math.html

    Also interesting is a Q & A session with Tom Morgan, who talks about building the super computer:
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/morgan-chudnovskys.html

     
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